The Health Benefits of Kale

Dark leafy greens are widely known to be the most nutritious of vegetables, but even among the greens, kale may stand alone as the single most nutritious vegetable! In recent years, kale has gained tremendous popularity as a go-to vegetable for its outstanding nutritional profile, versatility in dishes, and delicious flavor.

As with most vegetables, kale is grown in a number of varieties: leafy green, dinosaur, curly, and even ornamental for your garden. Kale belongs to the Brassica family of vegetables, which includes other cruciferous vegetables known to be nutrition all-stars, such as asparagus, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and broccoli. Among vegetables, cruciferous vegetables are widely touted for their anti-cancer properties. Numerous studies have been conducted and repeated showing a strong correlation between the consumption of eating cruciferous vegetables and a lower risk of all forms of cancer. This lowered risk is regularly attributed to the phytochemicals found in cruciferous vegetables, of which kale is especially abundant.

The health benefits of kale are attributed to its large concentration of various vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Kale is incredibly rich in Vitamin K, an important fat-soluble vitamin that can dramatically reduce of your chances of developing cancer, but is also important for numerous bodily functions, including helping to regulate blood clotting and reduce blood pressure. A single cup of cooked kale can contain as much as 1300% of your recommended daily intake! Kale is also abound with beta-carotene, the precursor to Vitamin A, another important nutrient connected to reducing your risk for cancer, as well as nearly all other age-related and degenerative diseases. That single cup of cooked kale can contain as much as 350% of your recommended daily intake! Kale is also a nutritional powerhouse when it comes to Vitamin C, manganese, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and iron. Potassium and magnesium are crucial minerals for optimum bodily function, especially when it comes to regulating blood pressure and lowering your risk for heart disease. Recent studies suggest that the calcium contained within kale is easily absorbed by the human body, making it an ideal food for those looking to maintain bone health.

Dark leafy greens, including kale, have been revered throughout history for their medicinal properties. They are frequently considered to be ‘liver cleansing foods,’ perhaps in part to their large concentrations of folate, a vitamin known to strengthen your liver, which in turns helps to cleanse and detoxify your body as a whole. Dark leafy greens are also widely known for their anti-inflammatory properties, helping to reduce all degenerative diseases, but also help remedy conditions such as arthritis and pain, and reduce your chances of heart disease and high blood pressure.

Kale can be prepared in a variety of ways. One of the most common methods of preparation is the lightly steam it, perhaps alone or accompanied by other vegetables. Likewise, you can also saute it lightly in a vegetable medley. A method of preparation that is gaining popularity is to create ‘kale chips.’ These ‘chips’ are created by wetting your kale and coating it in various ingredients, such as other vegetable powders (onion, garlic, carrot, bell pepper, etc.), ground seeds or nuts (sunflower seeds and cashews being the most popular), and nutritional yeast. After coating, the kale is then either dehydrated or cooked at a low temperature as to not burn. This is a unique, delicious, and nutritious method for eating kale. While you can make your own kale chips, they are now more easily located at numerous health food stores. You may find you like them more than potato chips!

6 Natural Remedies for the Common Cold

With Fall upon us, the wind arising and the weather changing, now is one of the most common times for people to fall prey to the dreaded common cold. While there are many things you can do to help prevent a cold — like staying active, eating a whole foods diet, and avoid those that already have the cold — what should you do once you actually have the cold? Rather than taking over the counter medications (which do have their place in extreme circumstances), there are many natural and time honored remedies to utilize to ensure you get back on your feet as soon as possible.

Keep in mind that the flu and the cold have similar symptoms, with the flu typically creating a great fever in the body. Both are can be characterized coughing, nasal congestion and runny nose, body aches, headaches, sneezing, and sore throat. Fortunately, most natural remedies that can be used to aid your body in combating the cold can be used to combat the flu, as well.

Rest and sleep are the primary remedies for curing any illness. And while these things may seem like a glaringly obvious remedy to many, we live in an extremely active culture. A cold (or the flu) is a sign that it is time to give our bodies a break, relax a bit, recharge our batteries. Resting allows our body’s immune system to get to work, to attack the opposing bacteria/virus and expose of it as needed. In addition, sleep allows our body to repair itself. Having a cold and sleeping as a remedy can do wonders for your body beyond simply exposing of bacteria — it can make your stronger, more ready to tackle the world once you’re back to your best. So take easy, let your immune system and other organs take care of you.

Fasting is more of an unconventional remedy when it comes to curing a cold and is typically not proscribed by medical professionals. Yet, fasting — obtaining from food for 24-48 hours while you are sick — can take a significant amount of strain off your entire body. Digestion is among the most energy taxing processes in our body, a significant amount of energy is actually required in order to extract energy from the food you eat. By not eating for a short period, this energy can be diverted to the systems in your body where it most required. In this instance, toward your immune system and liver to better defend and dispose of offending organisms. Be sure to drink plenty of liquids while fasting — you may want to consider a juice fast if an full fast proves to be too much for you. Dilute fruit juices with water, or consider using freshly pressed vegetable juices.

Honey has be utilized traditionally in many, many cultures throughout the world as an aid for the flu. Numerous studies have shown that utilizing honey as an aid for an irritated or sore throat, and as a cough suppressant, to be effective, especially for children. While it isn’t completely understood why honey may be beneficial as a natural remedy, its effectiveness is widely attributed honey’s natural antioxidants obtained from the flowers from which bees harvest the pollen, as well as its wide array of natural enzymes. Use honey in moderation, as it is still a sugar.

Garlic, the lovely stinking rose, it a widely touted natural remedy for the common cold. Cultures throughout the world have used garlic in various forms for thousands of years, creating a variety of concoctions to be used as a natural remedy. Modern research attributes garlic’s effectiveness to a molecule called allicin, a potent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal compound that also gives garlic it’s potent kick as an herb. Garlic can be infused into easy to digest foods, such as broths and vegetable soups, but is most potent for fighting a cold in its raw state. Try crushing raw garlic and mixing it in a bit of warm water to make it more palatable, or be daring and eat it whole!

Immune System Boosting Herbs have also been used throughout time to help fight the cold. Three of the most common herbs utilized throughout the world (other than garlic!) are: ginseng, astragalus, and echinacea. In addition to help boost your immune system, all three of these herbs are considered to be adaptogens, herbs that help your body perform better under any form of stress, and thus are excellent to be taken any time. I will be doing a future article on herbs to boost your immune system, and will explain these three herbs in greater detail. Know for now that these three herbs have a long tradition of use, and can be found in pill or tincture form in many health food stores. Tinctures, where the herb’s essence is extracted using alcohol (thus making it more potent), are the easiest form in which to take these. Try adding a small amount to a class of water — you may start to feel a difference immediately!

No natural remedy list for the cold would be complete without Vitamin C! While it is best to obtain Vitamin C naturally from nutrient rich food, such as from Vitamin C rich fruits and vegetables (Oranges, Bell Peppers, Strawberries, Cabbage, etc.), when sick, it may be of some benefit to supplement yourself with some extra Vitamin C! Vitamin C can be found easily over the counter and almost any drug store, market, or health food store. Try adding a couple thousand milligrams to your repertoire when sick. In addition, Vitamin C has been shown to help rebuild your adrenal glands, which help manage stress in your body — you may even find your ability to cope with stress and illness increase after being sick!