Vegetable Oils Will Destroy Your Health!

Fat and oil in our diet is one of the most widely misunderstood and confusing subjects when it comes to our health. Decades ago we were informed that a ‘low-fat’ diet was optimal for energy, health, and preventing nearly all diseases — especially heart disease. We were then informed that fats are crucial for health, yet also told that the best fats to consume are vegetable oils. Vegetable oils have widely been touted to help lower blood pressure, prevent heart disease, aid weight loss, and even help to lower cholesterol. Almost every product that contains vegetable oils has today been labeled as ‘Heart Healthy.’ But the truth is that consuming vegetable oils will actually destroy your health!

Vegetable oils are generally produced from seemingly healthy foods: from soybeans, corn, rapeseed (canola oil), safflower, sunflower, etc. Yet, if we think back 100 years, oils produced from these plants were non-existent. Technology had yet to be developed that would actually allow oil to be extracted from these plants. Especially in the case of soybeans and corn, think about eating a soybean or a kernel of corn. How much fat do they contain? Not much. In the early 1900s chemical solvents, usually petroleum based, were created that allowed oils to be extracted and separated from their whole-food form. These chemical solvents were (and are) cheap to produce, and could be applied to nearly any crop. Manufacturers applied these cheap chemicals to the cheapest crops, creating a large surplus of vegetable oil. Now vegetable oils are in everything: margarine, mayonnaise, salad dressing, roasted nuts and seeds, and almost every processed food!

Vegetable oils will destroy your health for two reasons: they way in which they are manufactured and their chemical makeup.

Because vegetable oils tend to be extracted from the cheapest of crops, they tend to derive from genetically modified (GMO) crops. In the case of canola oil, oil cannot be extracted from a non-genetically modified variety of rapeseed! The variety of rapeseed from which oil is extracted was specifically engineered to have oil extracted from it! I’ll have a future article on why to avoid GMOs, but know that genetically modified crops also tend to be the crops with the most heavily used pesticides and herbicides. Oil is a concentrated form of a food, thus oils have a much greater concentration of whatever pesticides and herbicides were sprayed on its whole-form!

When vegetable oil is extracted from it’s whole-form, it is extracted by heating the food and applying the chemical solvent. Waxy residues are created from this heat and chemical mixture, and must be removed by applying yet another mixture of heat and a chemical acid. If this doesn’t sound that tempting — it’s not. At this point, vegetable oils have an unappetizing color and smell. Manufacturers know this, so use even more chemicals to make the color more appetizing. This is followed by another chemical process to deodorize the oil. Such chemicals used in these processes include bleach and hexane, an extremely dangerous chemical known to be a neurotoxin and potent carcinogen (a cancer promoting substance). Residue from the chemicals required for extraction are found in vegetables. These chemicals combined with the pesticides and herbicides used for growing the crop create a vegetable oil that is, in actuality, a toxic concoction.

Vegetable oils by their chemical nature are mostly polyunsaturated fats. The chemical structure of polyunsaturated fats makes them extremely sensitive to heat: even a minor heating (such as light cooking) can damage the chemical structure, making them rancid and unfit for consumption. Vegetable oils are the most polyunsaturated of all oils! Yet the process required for extracting vegetable oil requires a high-temperature heating, not once, but twice! The reason oils smell unpalatable during manufacturing is because the oils have spoiled, they’re rancid. By using a deodorizing process, manufacturers cover up this reality. Rancid and spoiled oils are one of the most damaging foods you can consume. Rancid fats promote free radicals (those things anti-oxidants are supposed to help reduce), are toxic to the body (your body does not know how to eliminate them properly), and promote full-body inflammation (known to promote all major diseases and disorders).

Additionally, vegetable oils contains a large concentration of Omega-6 oils. While Omega-6 fats are important for health, the majority of people’s diets contain far too many Omega-6. A balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fats are required for health, but an overabundance of Omega-6 promoted an over-inflammation of the body. As mentioned above, inflammation is perhaps the single largest and universal cause of all major diseases and disorders, especially heart disease and high blood pressure.

So what oils should you consume? Sticking with traditional oils, oils that have been consumed for millenia, are the safest and most health promoting! Such oils include coconut oil, palm fruit oil, and butter. While these oils are saturated fats, they are not dangerous to your health! Check out all the benefits of coconut oil! The saturated chemical structure of these fats makes them more stable than polyunsaturated vegetable oils, and thus extremely safe and the oil of choice for cooking. And while olive oil is a vegetable oil, it is perhaps the only safe vegetable oil for consumption. Buying cold-pressed, extra virgin olive oil is your best bet, as the extraction process requires minimal heat and has been extracted for thousands of years without the use of chemical solvents.

Choosing the highest quality fats and oils in your diet will give you large gains in your overall health. Stick with traditional oils, and avoid vegetable oils that have only existed for a few decades, including eating the processed foods that contain them. You’ll find you feel better, reduce your risk for all major diseases, and you’ll probably enjoy them more, too!

The Gluten Free Grains

With so many people trying to go ‘Gluten Free,’ a lot of people wonder what to eat. Whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or an omnivore, removing gluten containing foods can be easy if you keep your foods simple: keep them as whole, or as close to their natural form, as possible. Load up on veggies, fruits, high quality lean meats and dairy, nuts, seeds, and excellent starches such as potato and sweet potato. But if you’re looking for another source of food in grains, what should you choose? Which grains are gluten free?

Fortunately, the majority of grains in the world actually do not contain gluten. This is excellent for variety purposes. However, many of the most widely available grains do contain gluten. Grains such as wheat, rye, barley, and spelt contain this protein. If you’re not sure what gluten is, be sure to click here!

QuinoaQuinoa is a rising star in the grain world, though it is not technically a grain. Hailing from the desert highlands of Central America, quinoa is a pseudo-grain, a grain like seed of the Chempodium genus of plants — a relative of beets and spinach. Quinoa is highly revered in Central American tradition, largely in part due to its exceedingly high nutrient profile, especially in regards to manganese and magnesium. Additionally, quinoa is one of the few starches in the world to contain a protein profile said to be ‘complete.’ That is, containing all the amino acids required to support human life. Among grains, quinoa is especially high in the amino acid tryptophan. Quinoa can be found readily available in health food stores, but is becoming more a mainstream food stuff, and thus can also be found in many other grocery markets. Cook it as a porridge or keep it light and fluffy for a salad!

OatsOats have a long history for human consumption, being one of the first grains to be harvested in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, though gained an even stronger foothold as a crop in Europe. Oats are widely touted for their unique fiber content, of which the majority if a soluble fiber, meaning it dissolves in water. As such, they are largely promoted for helping to lower blood pressure. Oats can be found on the market as either whole-oat groats (an unroasted variety, in it’s most whole form) or as rolled oats, the most commonly available form. Rolled oats are roasted, steamed, and then pressed to give them their distinctive shape. Oats are also a very nourishing grain, being high in manganese and selenium. It is important to note that oats are commonly grown alongside gluten containing grains, or processed in facilities that also process gluten containing grains. As such, if you are extremely sensitive to gluten, it is possible to find brands that process oats and other grains in a dedicated gluten free facility. Because of the soluble fiber of oats, it is frequently eaten as a porridge.

Rice is the third most consumed and produced crop in the world! It has a very long history of consumption in the Asian area of the world, largely due to requiring large amounts of water, in which it must be immersed, in order to grow — commonly called a rice paddy. Rice also has a history of being one of the first grains to be highly processed in the form of Brown Ricewhite rice, where the hull is removed and the grain then polished. While it is interesting to note that the nutritional deficiencies brought by polished white rice and far lower than that of any other grain (such as white wheat flour), brown rice is far more nourishing variation. Brown rice is nutrient rich in B-vitamins, higher than any other grain, and also a good source of manganese and selenium. Brown rice can be found in most any market, and can be paired with almost any other food for an excellent meal!

Blue CornCorn, or Maize, is the single largest most produced and consumed crop in the entire world! Corn likely hails from somewhere in Central America, most likely in the region of Mexico, and was originally used as a food crop by indigenous Native Americans. Since the arrival of the West, Corn has changed significantly. Corn was one of the first crops to be genetically modified, to have the genes of other organisms spliced into its own genome. I will touch on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in a future article, but for now know that it is best to find and consume only organic corn. There are many varieties of corn that exist, though the type we consume most is a sweet yellow corn variety. However, other varieties, especially Hopi blue corn, are gaining momentum for consumption. Corn is one of the few grains to be a decent source of Vitamin C, and like rice, can be paired with almost any other food for a delicious treat!

Millet in the United States is often considered to be and used as bird seed! Yet, this simple grain is one of the most widely consumed cereal crops in the world, frequently used as a staple food in regions in Africa and Asia. Like wheat and oats, millet was one of the first cereals to be cultivated as a food. Millet can come in a variety of colors, and looks Milletvery similar to quinoa. Millet can be found in many grocery stores, though you are more likely to find it in health food stores because of it’s lower demand as a food. Millet can be ground to make a bread called injera, a common food in Africa and Ethiopia, or can be made into a porridge. Millet has a slightly nutty flavor, but will take the flavor of whatever it is prepared with. Because of millet’s tendency to ‘cake,’ it is also excellent for use in veggie burgers or paired with other grains for a gluten free bread.

By expanding your pallet and trying new grains, going gluten free can be easy!

Should You Go Gluten Free? And What is Gluten Anyway?

Gluten and BreadThere is a new movement in the health world: going gluten free. Gluten free is becoming mainstream, it’s no longer just for the devout health conscious among us. New gluten free products abound on the shelves, new items popping up weekly. But what is ‘gluten free’ exactly? For that matter, what’s gluten?

Gluten is a complex protein molecule found in many of the most commonly available grains. Wheat is the primary grain associated with gluten, but it can also be found in rye, barley, and ancient varieties of wheat (such as triticale, spelt, and einkorn). Gluten is the molecule responsible for the chewiness in bread products, and is in part responsible for trapping the gasses that make bread rise. Because of gluten’s sticky nature, it is also commonly used as a filler or binder in processed food, and is frequently used to make imitation meat products or boost the protein content of foods.

Going gluten free means avoiding any and all products that have gluten, be it whole wheat or barley, or any processed products that contain the flours of the gluten grains (such crackers, pasta, etc.). The reasons for going gluten free deal specifically with your overall health and your sense of well being. The major disorder associated with gluteWheatn is Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder caused by the ingestion of gluten. Symptoms of Celiac disease can be broad, but can include: bloating, diarrhea, headaches, depression, joint pain, and a multitude of others. However, it is becoming more widely accepted that Celiac disease may be the most extreme of gluten sensitivities, and that a broad range of sensitivities from the mild to the extreme exists.

The only way to be sure you have Celiac disease is to get tested by your doctor. However, many people will test negative for the condition. That doesn’t mean you aren’t sensitive to gluten, however. Many of the common symptoms of Celiac disease are also experienced by those who test negative. One of the best ways to test your sensitivity is to self-test for a gluten allergy or intolerance. Try removing gluten from your diet for a week if you suspect you may be sensitive, and note how you feel.

Many people find that by removing gluten from their diet they have increased physical energy, increased mental energy, better sleep, less joint and body aches, less headaches, better physical recovery, better digestion (including bowel movements), less skin issues (including acne and skin blemishes), and even better mood. Many of these benefits have been reaped in my own life since removing gluten from my diet, especially increased mood and body aches. Additionally, I have found that by eliminating wheat and barley specifically from my diet, many seasonal allergies that I once thought ‘normal’ have either minimized or disappeared.

CookieNote that not everyone is sensitive to gluten. Many individuals find that they tolerate gluten just fine and receive no benefit by removing it from their diet. Cutting gluten from your diet also doesn’t automatically mean your diet will be healthier than if you did include gluten. With the numerous products being released, gluten free varieties of over-processed foods are also in the mix. A gluten free cookie is still a cookie filled with sugar and excess calories – it just doesn’t have wheat or barley. However, they are numerous excellent products abound that are gluten free and healthful – choose your products wisely.

Testing positive for Celiac disease or self-testing and finding you have a gluten sensitivity is not the end of your food world. There are numerous alternatives to the common gluten grains, such as cutting out grains entirely, or including the non-gluten grains in your diet: rice, corn, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, millet, and oats (Note: many oats are produced on equipment that also process gluten grains. If you are extremely sensitive to gluten, buy gluten-free oats, or oats processed in a gluten-free facility). While a life without bread may seem difficult, it is quite doable. You’ll want to experiment with your foods, find the dishes that best suit your tastes, and learn to incorporate them into your lifestyle. For example, try making this gluten free sunflower cake! It is especially important to read all food labels if you find you cannot tolerate gluten, as it is added to numerous products. Read carefully, and select products that do not include gluten.

As with gluten sensitivity itself, there is a spectrum of how much gluten some people can tolerate. Some will find they will be able to tolerate small amounts, while some may find they cannot tolerate any. Continue self-testing for your sensitivity and see where you lie on the spectrum! And again, if you suspect you might be at all sensitive to gluten, try cutting out all gluten products for 7 days and see how you feel!