Quick Easy Meals: Carbs

The most controversial element of a modern meal: The carbohydrate. In the last decade or so, the dreaded “carb” has become a macronutrient of dispute. (Previously, the most demonized macronutrient was fat.) The Paleo folks love to tell me how our caveman ancestors just ate meat and vegetables, and that carbs and grains are the cause of all modern ailments.

I hate the pull the “credential” card, but I do have a degree in Anthropology. I’ve read books upon books of pollen samples, indigenous garbage heap study, and bone/tissue testing. I’ve also stayed with tribal people, and read countless reports from field anthropologists. And you know what all of these studies have in common? That the food of tribal life was centered around a main carbohydrate source. (The only exception being the Inuits of Alaska/Cananda, since they spent much of the year in winter. But this is such a tiny tiny percentage of all tribal people, they are the exception and not the rule. They also showed signs of aging faster than almost all other tribes.)

Healthy CarbohydratesCarbs are a great energy source; our body uses them more efficiently than protein or fat. (Our body uses fat more efficiently than protein, protein is the least efficient source of energy, and our body has the most difficult time converting it to energy. That does not mean that we shouldn’t eat protein, but that shouldn’t be our prime energy source.)

But I digress, because the point of the video below is not to argue why you should eat carbohydrates, but how you can cook them quickly and easily. When tasks are simple and time-efficient, it’s more likely that you will follow through and eat home-cooked meals more often. If something is too difficult, most people will choose an easier option (like the drive-through or eating out.)

This video will give you some ideas, and I will follow up with quick meal ideas for protein and vegetables.

In summary:

Cook a large amount of a healthy carb on an afternoon off. Choose a designated day and time each week, and block off your schedule for your cooking prep day. I choose a different carb each week, so that I’m eating a variety of food. (Choosing seasonal food has bonus advantages.)
I’ll boil a bag of colored potatoes, a big pot of brown rice, or a large amount of gluten-free pasta. (Remember, for carbs, show-release carbohydrates that contain fiber will be healthier than quick burning white starch. So brown rice is better than white flour.) I refrigerate (or even freeze) the weekly carb, then come up with different dishes I can make with that.
For example: for brown-rice pasta, I can make:
*A oven-roasted vegetable pasta dish
*Eggs/cheese/mushroom pasta scrample
*Asian-style sesame pasta with tempeh and enoki mushrooms.

So the possibilities are endless….you can do the same thing with some organic, colored fingerling potatoes:
*Shepard’s pie
*Breakfast scrample with roasted turnips and cauliflower
*Olive oil, rosemary, and veggie oven roasted potatoes.
And since the potatoes/rice/pasta is already cooked, you just have to heat it up with the veggies! My meals take me an average of 15 minutes, since I have everything prepped ahead of time. A couple hours on a Sunday can save you tons of time and money the rest of the week!

The Basics of a Healthy Meal Plan

Quite awhile ago, I wrote an article about the importance of a balanced meal. I don’t think it’s healthy to eliminate a food group…i.e., “Low Carb,” “Low Fat,” etc. We need a balanced amount of carbs, protein, and fat in our daily meals. (There are more complications in sports nutrition, as there are different things you should eat before/after working out, for muscle soreness and recovery, etc. But, I will discuss this in a later article.) For the most part, to have a steady stream of energy throughout the day, you need a balanced combination of all the macronutrients (carbs, protein, and fat).
In the video, I also discuss what a protein really is. There is the common misconception that a complete protein only comes from animal sources. (If this were true, vegans would die very quickly.) For an in-depth look at protein, you can also check my older article on the basics of protein.
For true health and vibrance, many people forget about the importance of micronutrients. These are all the vitamin and mineral buzzwords you’ll see on a food package. Vitamin D, electrolytes, Vitamin C, potassium, B-Vitamins, etc. You get the idea. These can be found in whole foods, especially fruits and vegetables, but also in nuts, seeds, and legumes. People tend to concentrate on the macronutrients (carbs, protein, and fat.) But, we would be able to just manufacture a fake, perfect food source if these elements were the only important aspect of a healthy diet. The micronutrients, fiber, and clean water that fruits and vegetables provide are essential for good health.

So here is my video discussion of a balanced meal.